The wines of Faugères by Rosemary George

The wines of FaugeresWhy write a book on Faugères? Because it is there. Because it is the nearest vineyard to my Languedoc home. Because I love the wines and their variety within this small area. I tasted and drank my first Faugères on an early visit to the Languedoc in 1987, when Gérard Alquier, whose sons have continued to make exemplary wine, gave me a perfumed 1985, as well as his experimental cuvée of an oak-aged wine and I immediately loved the spicy flavours of fruits rouges and garrigues. I have never been able to resist them ever since.

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The tale of the hanged-unhanged man by Janice Lert

The gallinero in Santo Domingo de la Calzada where the hen and rooster are kept.

The tale of the hanged unhanged man

Once upon a time there was a road, called the Via Tolosana, that crossed Languedoc all the way from Arles to Toulouse, then continued through the Pyrénées mountains and on to Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain. In the Middle Ages, thousands if not millions of pilgrims wore out the soles of their shoes over the centuries on this route, heading for Compostela and praying on the relics of all the saints they met along the way. The trail is still important today: walking the entire route takes about two months.

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It could NEVER happen: a cautionary tale by Metrice Harris-Weedman

US elections a cautionary taleNever in a million years did I think I would wake up to a victorious Trump on the 9th of November. I stayed up as long as my droopy eyes would allow, and when I turned out the light, I felt not only confident Hillary would prevail but somewhat smug about the polls listing her with an over 70% chance of being the next American president. I even contacted a cousin and close friends to make sure my daughter got some of the campaign loot to mark this important moment in women’s history. Despite my supposed over confidence, something kept waking me at regular intervals throughout the night. Each time, I would blindly reach out for my device and quickly look up the election progress. Each time, I would see Trump’s numbers increase, and Hillary’s big lead gradually erode. Bleary eyed, by the time the morning alarm woke my husband, I was in a state of shock. With two States left to count, Trump was the almost guaranteed the presidency. By mid-morning, the election was called and, dare I say it, Trump became the President-elect.

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Do not enter : Why is the word PRIVATE so difficult to understand?! by Bernice Clark

Do not enterWhen out and about and spotting an interesting private property I understand that the owners aren’t expecting unwanted visitors. That’s simple. Why is it then that our own home, bearing signage that clearly states it’s private, does not afford the same respect? We’re plagued with uninvited visitors!

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Children’s therapy: what it looks like by Gorana Arnaud

In general, treating children in therapy is more complicated then treating adults. When an adult is in therapy, there is only one person for the therapist to consider: the patient. With a child, there are at least two distinct entities: the child, and the parent. Should the father and mother be separated or in conflict, there might be three sides to take into account. However, this does not mean that the counsellor must play the role of mediator or 'referee' as can sometimes be the case in particularly difficult sessions of couples’ therapy. When a child is involved, the only thing that really matters is what is in his or her best interest.

Children s therapy

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Who Do You Think You Are?

Who Do You Think You Are NLBrian Langston, writer, performance coach and psychological profiler living in Hérault examines the science behind our personality and preferences and explores how we can find out more about ourselves and the things which drive us.

 

 

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